THINGS THAT CAN HARM YOUR CAT

September 03, 2018

Thanks to the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) for this very important information.

These 101 things could harm your Bengal cat by causing poisoning, choking, burns or other serious injuries.

Dangerous Household Items

  • Ibuprofen and aspirin 
  • Disinfectants
  • Acetaminophen 
  • Bleach
  • Cold and flu meds 
  • Lime/scale remover
  • Antidepressants 
  • Paint thinners
  • Vitamins 
  • Lighter fluids
  • Diet Pills 
  • Insecticides
  • Anti-cancer drugs 
  • Flea and Tick products
  • Tobacco products 
  • Rodent bait
  • Detergents 
  • Mothballs
  • Fabric softener 
  • Fly bait
  • Drain cleaners Lead
  • Oven cleaner sprays 
  • Liquid potpourri

Harmful Foods

  • Chocolate 
  • Salt
  • Gun and candy 
  • Tea leaves
  • Grapes 
  • Coffee
  • Raisins 
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Macadamia nuts 
  • Raw yeast dough
  • Avocados 
  • Spoiled foods
  • Onions 
  • Fatty foods
  • Garlic

Harmful Objects

  • Ball Jewelries
  • Sharp objects 
  • Nylons
  • Coins 
  • Paperclips
  • Buttons 
  • Plastic wrap
  • Batteries 
  • Yarn or needles and thread
  • Twist ties 
  • Dental floss
  • Rubber bands 
  • Electrical cords
  • Cotton swabs 
  • Wax
  • Glass 
  • Socks
  • Hairpins 
  • Towels

Dangerous Household Plants

Make sure they are in places where your kitten cannot reach them or consider getting rid of them all together.

(If your pet induce a harmful substance, stay calm and don’t try to induce vomiting)

Aloe, Amarylis, Andromeda japonica, Asian lily, Asparagus fern, Australian Nut, Autumn crocus, Azalea, Belladonna, Bird of paradise, Bittersweet, Black locust, Branching ivy, Buckeye, Buddhist pine, Caladium, Calla lily, Cator bean, Ceriman, Clematis, Cordatum, Corn plant, Cycads, Cyclamen, Daffodil, Daylily, Devil’s ivy, Dieffenbachia, Dumbcane, Easter lily, Elephant ears, Emerald fern, English ivy, Eucalyptus, Ferns, Fiddle-leaf philodendron, Florida beauty, Foxglove, Glacier ivy, Gladiolas, Gold dust dracaena, Golden photos, Heavenly bamboo, Honeysuckle, Hurricane plant, Hyacinth, Hydrangea, Iris, Jerusalem cherry, Jimson weed, Kalanchoe, Lantana, Lilies, Lili of the valley, Lupine, Marble queen, Morning glory, mother in law, Mountain laurel, Narcissus, Needlepoint ivy, Nephthysis, Nightshade, Oleander, Panda, Peace lily, Philodendron, Poison hemlock, Precatory bean, Privet, Red emerald, Rhododendron, Ribbon plant, Sago palm, satin photos, Schefflera, Striped dracaena, Sweetheart ivy, Tulip, Water hemlock, wisteria, Yew, Yucca.

Trouble Areas

  • Doors and windows 
  • Toilets
  • Balconies 
  • Washer and Dryer
  • Bathtubs and sinks 
  • Fireplaces

Harmful Objects Outside Home

  • Algae 
  • Compost
  • Antifreeze/coolant 
  • Gasoline
  • Fire pit/grill 
  • Oil
  • Fences or gates 
  • Pesticides
  • Deck lattice 
  • Fertilizer
  • Non-pet safe de-icing salts 
  • Pools and hot tubs
Make sure your kitten is safe as he/she enjoys the outdoors. Poisoning symptoms vary, but your kitten may experience vomiting, diarrhea, or lethargy.

Holiday Hazards

Help your kitten enjoy the holidays safely by keeping them away from potential problems of these special days.

  • Valentine’s Day: Flowers and boxes of chocolate
  • Easter: Fake grass and small toys
  • 4th of July: Fireworks
  • Halloween: Candles, Halloween treats, chewable costumes
  • Thanks Giving: Turkey bones, hot containers
  • Christmas: Festive plants, holiday tree, light strands, tree water, ornaments, decoration hooks, tinsel, ribbons, styrofoam, yuletide fire
  • New Year’s: Balloons, confetti, all alcoholic beverages.

We guarantee you a Bengal Kitten (a companion) that has been bred for quality, health, and temperament that meets the breed's standard.

YOUR KITTEN COMES WITH....

September 03, 2018
Vaccinations:
    1st "Core" vaccination: 3-way (Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia) Given between 7 and 8 weeks of age.
    2nd "Core" vaccination: 3-way or 4-way (Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia, Chlamydia) Given between 10 and 12 weeks of age.

Health Guarantees:
    1. Deluxe Cattery guarantees that all kittens depart in good health and are free of Parasites (We will pay for the medicine if any are found)
    2. Deluxe Cattery offers a 5-year congenital replacement  guarantee for early death (see full contract - Client funded necropsy required)
    3. Deluxe Cattery offers 30 days of FREE Pet Health Insurance on kittens/cats under 1 year of age in US/Canada, through Trupanion - Requirements of breeders include:
           a. Access to meet Sire/Dam of Kittens
           b. Meets or exceeds recommended space guidelines
           c. Full Health Records given upon Adoption
           d. Fully licensed Cattery meeting Federal, State, County and City requirements
           
Free Micro-chipping 
      -All kittens at Deluxe Cattery are microchipped at approximately 3 - 4 weeks of age.
      -Full 15 digit, internationally usable Microchip    
      -Free registration of your kitten/cat, as well as all of your other animals, is available at www.foundanimals.org
       -Consider a donation to the wonderful organization who allows all of us to register our pets for no charge!

First Pet License Fee Paid - All Gordon County, GA Clients
    -Initial Kitten License fee paid by Deluxe Cattery.
    -Gordon County will automatically send you a renewal
    -Saves you the time and energy in researching this and signing up on your own!
Note: This is a requirement of ALL Gordon county cat/dog breeders/providers.

Copy of "Bengals Illustrated: Your New Bengal Kitten"




Food Samples (when available):
    -Fromm's "Chicken a la Veg" - Dry Kibble
    -15 lb bags available for $45 each ($54 on Amazon)
    -Other flavors available and able to be "interchanged" without causing digestion issues....  Available here for $55/15 lb bag.
      -Hasen Duckenpfeffer (Grain Free)
      -Beef Livattini (Grain Free)
      -Duck a la Veg
      -Salmon a la Veg
      -Game Bird (Grain Free)

Laminated Picture Pedigree by Deluxe Cattery
    Includes Photos of Parents and Grandparents (where available)
    as well as TICA registration Information for 4 generations

Valid Registration Papers
-Pet Clients: Proof of Neuter/Spay needs to be mailed/emailed
    to Deluxe Cattery in order to get registration paperwork (TICA Requirement)  
    Please request that you want the Breeder Slip if you do.
  -Clients register their pets once they receive the Breeder Slip for a fee
      of $20 that you mail into TICA to get an official Registration Number.    
      Note: You are allowed to show your kitten/cat once while paperwork
          is "pending", but after this - you need to have the official number.

-Breeders: Breeder Slip will either be sent to you via email or given to you in
     person (or mailed if it's not an electronic slip) once full payment has been made.
   -As long as the parent cats are fully owned by us, paperwork can be emailed
    to you usually within a week (95% of our kittens). If your kitten is the result of a partnership breeding, or mixed associations then paperwork can take up to 6 months.

Award Winning Cat/Kitten Wand of Your Choice
(for local pick ups only)

BENGAL CAT – CHARACTERISTICS AND CHARACTER

August 18, 2018
The Bengal cat is becoming one of the most popular cats in the United States where it originated. Even with this, however, they are still vastly underappreciated. Whether you are thinking of adopting one of these cats or have done so already, there may be some facts and details about this cat breed which you don’t yet know. This is why AnimalWised brings you information on the Bengal cat such as their origin, their character, potential health problems and other characteristics about this beautiful breed.



CATS 101: BENGAL

August 18, 2018
The wild look of the Bengal cat comes from its ancestors, the Asian leopard cat and the domestic shorthair. It’s breeding can account for its intelligence and wild nature, too.


ARE BENGALS HYPOALLERGENIC?

August 18, 2018

ARE BENGALS HYPOALLERGENIC?

Bengals aren’t hairless, and they don’t necessarily produce less Fel D1 protein than other breeds, so what makes them hypoallergenic? The answer is in their coats. Bengal cats have uniquely fine pelts that require considerably less maintenance than other breeds. As a result, Bengals don’t groom themselves as often or for as long, so their fur contains less allergen-rich saliva. They also don’t shed much, or shed far less than other cats, so whatever dander is present in their fur doesn’t get spread around as much. (Mom.me – 10 Hypoallergenic Cats)
Bengals have made the top 10 most hypoallergenic cat list for many reasons.  Most people who are allergic to cats have either no allergic reaction or a more milder reaction to Bengal cats when compared to the majority of other breeds.

This is believed to be the case for three main reasons:


  • Bengals are hybrids, therefor they are only partial domestic cat and partial Asian Leopard Cat. Their allergen-causing proteins may be different enough not to cause a reaction. This is only theory since it has not yet been tested.
  • Bengals have only one short tight layer of hair known more as a pelt. Other domestic cats have 2 layers of hair consisting of an undercoat and an overcoat. One pelt equates to less grooming and thus less allergen-causing saliva to permeate their pelt.
  • Bengals have zero to minimum shedding. Who wouldn’t want a house and wardrobe that was free of cat hair not to mention no hairball problems? So not only is there less saliva on a Bengal’s pelt, there’s also less of that pelt spreading around causing any allergy symptoms. (Lap Leopard Bengals – Hypoallergenic)

There’s really no such thing as non-allergenic cats. However, you can get pretty close with “hypoallergenic cats.” These felines are prone to shed less, or have less dander, which both are major causes of cat allergies. If you are willing to put up with minor symptoms of a cat allergy, a Bengal cat would be one of the ideal cats to bring into your home.

For more information about check out Bengals Illustrated article Bengal Cats–Are They Hypoallergenic?

THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT BENGALS

May 17, 2016

FUN BENGAL FACTS!
Having read the basic facts about Bengal cats, you may now read even more interesting ones. There is a whole lot of amazing facts about Bengal cats but the ones featured here are some of the very best.

1. Wild Ancestry
They have links to the really wild cats since they are the result of a cross between domestic cats and the Asian leopard. Since you now know that they have some links with wild cats, a little wild behavior from these cats won’t come as a surprise to you if you are looking to adopt one of them.

2. Bengals Easily Befriend Dogs
Often times, we use cats and dogs to refer to mortal enemies or to a severe downpour, but not this time. The Bengal cat has somehow learnt to win dogs’ hearts. In fact, they – just like humans –  could become a dog’s best friend. To make this friendship work most efficiently, the owner is advised to introduce a dog to the home when the Bengal is very much young or vice versa. This way, they grow together, watch out for each other and become dependable members of your entertainment crew!

3. They Love Water
Very clearly, this is another quality they share with tigers; their much distant relatives. Like you may have felt on discovering that they love to befriend dogs, you may also wonder why a cat should want to get fuddled in water. This is no much a surprise to you as it is to scientists but it is true. They play with water at the slimmest chance they get. Often times, you find them sipping some water from the little paws rather than dipping their heads into a bowl and lapping water from there. Their love for water, combined with their dexterity at fishing, make them a potential threat to your aquarium if you have one in your home.

4. They Know Just How to Steal
Call it kleptomania or anything you want to call it, but these cats love pick and “borrow” items that catch their fancy. When I say borrow, I am trying to be polite with words because in reality, they don’t return the things they borrow. So watch out for that beautiful piece of tablecloth on the table. Its secret admirer may have some use for it if you don’t mind.

5. They are Amazing Hunters
Cats are famed worldwide for their impeccable ability to hunt down small snakes, rats and other lower reptiles such as lizards. Their rivalry with flightless birds is also renowned but it seems the Bengal cat has taken this avian rivalry to a whole new level. Once they sight a bird, they become automatically excited and would do anything within their power to play with these birds. Most times, or even at all times, this play is never one that favors the birds. If you have an avian pet; say a macaw or cardinal bird for instance, you should provide extra security for them because your dear feline pet will come for them – guilty or not.

6. Excellent Climbers
If you wouldn’t mind enjoying your cat do some acrobatic displays once in awhile – and who wouldn’t love to acrobatics – you will find the Bengal cat much fun in your house. They have the energy of gorillas and the agility of monkeys. You can count on them to climb to heights you never expected them to reach, as well as expect them to hop somewhat incredible distances too.


10 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE GETTING A BENGAL CAT!

  1. They are very intelligent (and not very intelligent at the same time!).
  2. They poop a lot. They are VERY proud of their poop and everything that has to do with their poop.
  3. They can be extremely hyperactive and excited about every single little thing.
  4. You might need to share your shower. Bengals are known to LOVE water.
  5. They like to hear their own voices.
  6. They will stalk you. Ninja cat style, even.
  7. They will stalk your other pets.
  8. They will chew things. Just about anything they can find.
  9. Convincing them to wear a collar might prove problematic.
  10. The most important thing of all; They have the BEST personalities and make the BEST faces!

THE BENGAL CAT BREED

May 12, 2016

AN INTRODUCTION

GENERAL DESCRIPTION
Loved by those who appreciate its inquisitive and loving nature, the Bengal is a medium to large cat renowned for its richly colored, highly contrasted coat of vivid spots or distinctive marbling. Originally developed from crosses between the domestic cats and the Asian Leopard Cat, the Bengal is the only domestic cat that can have rosettes like the markings on Leopards, Jaguars and Ocelots. Today’s domestic Bengal cat comes only from breeding Bengals to other Bengals and requires no specialized care. Since their beginnings in 1986, the Bengal’s regal beauty and alluring charm have quickly made it one of the most popular breeds. Employing scientific insights and a cooperative spirit, Bengal breeders continue to develop these stunning cats with careful selection for temperament, health and beauty. Bengals participate in TICA shows throughout the world and have a devoted following of happy pet owners who couldn’t imagine sharing their lives with anything other than these feline beauties.

HISTORY
Throughout history there are indications of a profound human fascination with the large and small wild felines that inhabit the jungles and forest of the world. In 1963, Jean S. Mill crossed the domestic cat with the Asian Leopard Cat, a spotted five to twelve pound shy wild cat species from Asia. This was the first effort to use hybrid offspring to create a breed of domestic cat with the loving nature of a favored fireside tabby and the striking look associated with Leopards, Ocelots and Jaguars. The modern Bengal breed traces to cats bred by Mrs. Mill beginning in the early 1980’s. The breed’s name is a reference to the scientific name of the Asian Leopard Cat, Prionailurus bengalensis. The hybrid crosses are registered as Foundation (F1, F2 & F3) Bengals that are not eligible for show and only the females are used for breeding.

Accepted as a new breed in TICA in 1986, Bengals gained championship status in 1991. They are now one of the most frequently exhibited breeds in TICA. An enthusiastic group of breeders around the world have successfully fulfilled the goal of creating a docile, civilized house cat that wears the richly patterned coat of the jungle cats and has some of the arresting features that have inspired and aroused humanity for centuries.

PERSONALITY
While you can train a Bengal to have “good manners”, they are an active, inquisitive cat that loves to be up high. If you don’t like a cat to leave the floor, a Bengal is probably not the right cat for you. Bengals are busy by nature. They are very affectionate and can be a “lap cat” whenever THEY want to be, but in general their idea of fun is playing, chasing, climbing and investigating. When a Bengal is in full play mode, it’s rather like trying to hold on to running water! They’ll often save the cuddle time for when they want to sleep. Many Bengals enjoy water and may join you in brushing your teeth or taking a shower. Some Bengals are vocal while others are more quiet and selective about using their voice.

Bengals will also, in general, ALWAYS want to be where you are. After all, that’s where the action is! And Bengals are all about “The Action”. When given the choice of a static toy, and one that does wild, unpredictable things, Bengals will always choose the “wild” one! For individuals or families who enjoy rambunctious, funny, beautiful and dynamic feline companionship, consider the Bengal.

TRAITS
The Bengal is most noted for it luxurious short, soft coat which may appear in either the spotted or marble pattern. Some Bengal’s coats feature something called glitter which imparts an iridescent sheen to each hair. The spotted pattern is most associated with the “leopard look” as the coat features clearly discernible spots and rosettes. The Bengal’s spots can be large or small and often include rosettes, like the spots of Jaguars and Leopards, which are two- toned spots. Bengals may also be marbled, which is a derivative of the classic or “bull’s eye” pattern found in many breeds of cats but with an especially dramatic appearance in Bengals. The marbled Bengal has a swirling pattern that appears as random swirls or thick diagonal and horizontal lines flowing across the coat of the cat.

The most popular color of the Bengal is the brown/black tabby, a lackluster description for coats that can be anywhere from a cool grey to vibrant shades of golden, bronze, copper or mahogany with spots or marbling ranging from rich browns to intense black. Bengals also come in a range of colors associated with a form of albinism, called “snow” by breeders, that indicates Siamese and Burmese ancestry. In these colors the coat appears ivory, cream or light tan with spots or marbling that may range from light brown to dark chocolate and the eye color is blue to aqua. Silver Bengals have grey to nearly white backgrounds with dark grey to black patterns. Also distinctive about the Bengal’s coloring is that they may have nearly white undersides and facial markings that still show the tabby pattern.

Bengals are medium to large cats, from 6-15 pounds, with males generally being larger than females. A healthy Bengal is well muscled and has an appearance that depicts its athleticism. Bengals are balanced cats and none of its physical features should appear exaggerated or especially pronounced.

Bengals are generally confident, curious and devoted companions. They get along well with other pets when properly introduced and enjoy being part of a family. Each Bengal is an individual and those interested should find out as much as they can about this wonderful breed before adding one to their family.

Article Source: https://www.tica.org/en/cat-breeds/item/184-bengal-introduction

Generations of breeding between the two cats have lead to Bengal coats ranging in color from orange, tan, light brown, or silver, and coats are usually accented with bold glitter, stripes, or rosettes. Rosettes are markings that have two distinct colors or shades in them and are formed by a darker outline around a lighter center and are usually shaped in the form of an arrowhead, donut, or half donut. Rosettes are a unique Bengal trait that is not seen in other breeds. Bengal kittens will also have a white underbelly that contains spots.

Bengal Markings and Colors
Bengal kittens are born with beautiful markings, which give an indication of what the kittens will look like as an adult. As early as three weeks of age, Bengal kittens go through a stage known as the Ugly Fuzzies. Like their wild counter parts, Bengal kittens develop a coat that is meant to camouflage, or mute, their markings with white tipped guard hairs in order to help hide the kittens from danger. Between five and nine months the beautiful adult coat begins to appear and highlights the beautiful markings unique to Bengal cats.

BENGAL BREED: TICA AND CFA BENGAL BREED STANDARDS

May 12, 2016

BENGAL BREED: THE INTERNATIONAL CAT ASSOCIATION BENGAL BREED STANDARD (TICA)

BENGAL BREED: THE CAT FANCIERS' ASSOCIATION BENGAL BREED STANDARD (CFA)